Natural Age Spot Remover

age spotsDo you have age spots? Sometimes known as liver spots, they usually appear on your hands as brown spots on fair skinned individuals. Now you can make age spots magically disappear using ingredients found in every home.

Flat brown spots on your face and hands, often called age spots or liver spots, develop on fair-skinned folk around middle age or older. They are caused by an accumulation of pigment in the skin. True age spots are harmless, but if you don’t love how they look, here’s a natural remedy to make them disappear. 

Shameless plug follows .  . .

Is your Medicare supplement plan making your bank account disappear? Almost everyone we talk to is paying too much. Common savings of $50 per month or more are not unusual. We showed one couple how to save over $1700 per year by making a change in their Medicare supplement plan F.

Shop and compare up to 40 Medigap plans in 60 seconds. Click here now to review plans.

Squeeze a grated onion through cheesecloth so that you have one teaspoon of onion juice. Mix it with two teaspoons of white vinegar, and massage the brown spots with this liquid until it’s pretty much absorbed into the skin. Do this daily—twice a day, if possible—until you no longer see spots before your eyes.

Follow this link for the rest of the article from Household Daily Magic Tips.

 

#NaturalAgeSpotRemover

Obamacare Scam Targets Seniors

CBS news reports on a new Obamacare scam that targets seniors. Playing off the lack of real information about Obamacare and who is affected, these scammer’s prey on the misinformed public in order to swindle you out of your hard earned money.  obamacare scam

Scammers are trying to fool consumers, in many cases seniors, into giving up personal information by claiming they’ve been selected to be among the first to get insurance cards for “Obamacare.”

The solicitors, sometimes pretending to be federal government workers, tell people they can get all signed up by giving them their bank account and Social Security numbers. Better Business Bureau officials say the fact that not many people know about the Affordable Care Act only helps the flimflammers.

CBS News

Protect yourself from an Obamacare scam.

Most people will not get “free” health insurance under Obamacare. Low income people will qualify for Medicaid or some form of taxpayer assistance in paying their health insurance premiums.

No doubt many volunteers and paid canvassers will be hitting neighborhoods, knocking on doors, hanging out at Wal-Mart and senior centers in hopes of finding victims willing to buy into this Obamacare scam.

Don’t fall for it.

There is no such thing as a free lunch (or free health insurance).

 

 

WD-40, Miracle in a Can

WD-40 is truly a miracle in a can. Just look at what you can do with WD-40.   wd40

WD-40 who knew?
“Water Displacement #40”.
The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreaser to protect missile parts.
WD-40 was created in 1953, by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company.
Its name comes from the project that was to find a ‘Water Displacement’ Compound.
They were finally successful for a formulation, with their fortieth attempt, thus WD-40.
The ‘Convair Company’ bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.
Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you.
When you read the ‘shower door’ part, try it.
It’s the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door.
If yours is plastic, it works just as well as on glass.
It’s a miracle!
Then try it on your stovetop.
It’s now shinier than it’s ever been.
You’ll be amazed.

WD-40 Uses:
1. Protects silver from tarnishing.
2. Removes road tar and grime from cars.
3. Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
4. Gives floor that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery.
5. Keeps the flies off of Cows, Horses, and other Farm Critters, as well. (Ya gotta love this one!!!)
6. Restores and cleans chalkboards.
7. Removes lipstick stains.
8. Loosens stubborn zippers.
9. Untangles jewelry chains.
10. Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
11. Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
12. Keeps ceramic / terracotta garden pots from oxidizing.
13. Removes tomato stains from clothing.
14. Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
15. Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
16. Keeps scissors working smoothly.
17. Lubricates noisy door hinges on both home and vehicles doors.
18. It removes that nasty tar and scuff marks from the kitchen flooring.
It doesn’t seem to harm the finish and you won’t have to scrub nearly as hard to get them off.
Just remember to open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
19. Remove those nasty Bug guts that will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly!
20. Gives a children’s playground gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
21. Lubricates gearshift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers…
22. Rids kids rocking chair and swings of squeaky noises.
23. Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
24. Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
25. Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
26. Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
27. Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
28. Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
29. Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
30. Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
31. Removes grease splatters from stovetops.
32. Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
33. Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
34. Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
35. Removes all traces of duct tape.
36. Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain.
37. Florida’s favorite use is: ‘cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.’
38. The favorite use in the state of New York, it protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
39. WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it’s a lot cheaper than the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose.
Keep in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.
40. Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
41. It is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray it on the marks and wipe with a clean rag.
42. Also, if you’ve discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and rewash. Presto! The lipstick is gone!
43. If you spray WD-40 inside a wet distributor cap, it will displace the moisture, allowing the engine to start.

 

Medicare, Social Security, Medicaid – All Discretionary Spending

 

George Will says all federal spending is ultimately “discretionary”

Members of Congress are actively working to cut the federal budget and bring down spending. But they’re steering clear of the politically difficult, big-ticket items such as Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, interest on the debt and national defense.

“It’s not being debated because they say we’re only going to debate discretionary spending. We should ban that word,” said conservative commentator George F. Will on This Week with Christiane Amanpour.

“It’s all discretionary, other than interest on the national debt. Social Security is discretionary. We have the discretion to change the law. Same is true with Medicare and Medicaid,” Will said.

We thought Will’s statement was a provocative and interesting way to frame the debate. But was it true? We decided to check it out.

We’ll begin with a brief lesson on the terms Congress uses to describe the federal budget.

Discretionary spending means government spending that Congress sets every year through a process known as appropriations. It includes spending for most federal agencies, such as transportation and health. It includes foreign aid and defense spending. And it includes most grant programs administered by the federal government.

Non-discretionary spending, on the other hand, is spending that is controlled by legislation that sets eligibility criteria or spending formulas. It includes entitlement programs such as Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security in which you are legally entitled to benefits as long as you meet certain criteria. It also typically includes programs for which individuals automatically qualify, such as farm subsidies or military benefits. Sometimes non-discretionary spending is called mandatory spending or direct spending.

We ran Will’s comments by four experts on the federal budget. They all said that Will was essentially correct, that non-discretionary spending can be changed at any time by passing new legislation that changes the particular program.

A recent example of this is the health care law supported by President Obama and Democrats in Congress. The law made many changes to Medicare, to reduce its spending, in order to offer subsidies for health care insurance to the uninsured.

“There is no constitutional roadblock to Congress changing any spending at any time. In that sense, all spending is discretionary,” said Marc Goldwein, policy director for the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

The reasons members of Congress are now so focused on discretionary spending is because it’s more politically difficult to change programs that affect benefits for so many voters.

“But you can’t stabilize the debt by focusing on only 12 percent of the budget,” Goldwein added. “Trying to do so is going to make the cuts far more painful than what would be necessary if we were to look more broadly.”

Both Medicare and Social Security were on the table in previous years when the budget needed adjustment, said the experts we consulted on both sides of the political aisle. Jim Horney of the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities noted that “every major deficit reduction plan in the last 20 years has made significant changes to Medicare.” Brian Riedl of the conservative Heritage Foundation pointed out that Social Security was changed significantly in 1983 in a deal between Democrats in Congress and President Ronald Reagan.

Interest on the federal debt is a required payment unless the government is willing to default, a highly unlikely scenario. There are a few other contractually obligated payments the government has to make, typically for insurance programs such as mortgage insurance, flood insurance, and federal deposit insurance. But those payments are relatively small.

“I would add that even interest on the debt is in some way discretionary, because levels of debt can be changed by decisions to tax and spend and not run budget deficits,” said Josh Gordon, policy director of the Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan group that wants to eliminate deficits.

Will said that federal spending is “all discretionary, other than interest on the national debt. Social Security is discretionary. We have the discretion to change the law. Same is true with Medicare and Medicaid.” Will is making a broad statement here and leaves out a few details. But he’s largely correct, and we rate his statement True.

http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2011/mar/15/george-will/george-will-says-all-federal-spending-ultimately-d/

Medigap on the Chopping Block

Medigap cuts. Georgia seniors on Medicare may see their Medigap insurance policies cover less and less if Washington get’s their way. Many are on a fixed income and are just barely making it, but Washington believe Georgia Medicare supplement plans are bad for Medicare.

Kaiser Health News reports:

As debt limit talks drag on, lawmakers are eying possible changes in Medicare supplemental plans – moves that could increase seniors’ out-of-pocket costs.

Traditional Medicare, the federal health program for the elderly and disabled, requires beneficiaries to pay hospital deductibles and a portion of the cost of tests and doctor visits.  To protect themselves from those out-of-pocket costs, about 17 percent of beneficiaries buy Medigap plans.   Another 34 percent get such coverage through a former employer.

But some health policy experts say such “first-dollar protection” drives up demand for Medicare services, costing the government money for what may be unnecessary care. One proposal would bar supplemental insurance from completely eliminating out-of-pocket costs – or charge enrollees a $530 a year extra if they want to keep such protection. That change could save up to $53 billion over 10 years, according to a chart used during the bipartisan talks led by Vice President Joe Biden.

What is Medigap and why do people buy it?

Unlike most job-based health insurance, traditional Medicare does not include “catastrophic” coverage, an annual maximum upper limit on the amount beneficiaries could pay. So enrollees can be liable for thousands of dollars each year, including: $1,132 per-episode deductible for hospital admissions; hundreds of dollars in daily charges for hospital stays of longer than 60 days; a $162-a-year deductible for doctor care, plus 20 percent of charges for office visits or equipment like wheelchairs.

Ten standardized types of Medicare supplement plans offered by private insurers – including AARP’s UnitedHealthcare policies  – cover all or most of such deductibles and copayments.  Some employers also pay all or part of such costs for their retirees.

What changes are under consideration?

It is not clear exactly what’s on the table in the negotiations between congressional leaders and the White House.  But the charts  released show that one such proposal under consideration would bar insurers from offering supplemental policies unless the policies came with an annual deductible. People who didn’t want a deductible could pay $530 a year in additional premium to ensure that they won’t be hit with costs before their coverage kicks in.

Is this a new idea?

No.  It is a subset of a larger discussion about spending on Medicare and other entitlements. In recent years, the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform (The Bowles-Simpson Commission), the Debt Reduction Task Force, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and lawmakers, including Sen. Joe Lieberman, a Connecticut independent, and Sen. Tom Coburn, an Oklahoma Republican, have all suggested changing traditional Medicare.

Most of the ideas would create a single annual deductible – generally around $550 – after which beneficiaries would pay about 20 percent of medical costs up to a maximum annual cap, ranging from around $5,000 to more than $7,500.

Would changing supplemental coverage save money?

Some economists and policy experts say that supplemental coverage insulates beneficiaries from medical costs, driving up demand for unnecessary care. A study done for MedPAC in 2009 found that beneficiaries with supplemental insurance used more care and cost the program more money. The increased spending wasn’t for emergency hospitalizations, but for other services such as elective hospital admissions, preventive care, doctor office visits and some types of tests.

Supporters of the insurance say it shields seniors from unpredictable costs and reduces big-ticket expenses by encouraging them to seek help for medical problems before they become severe.

What else do people say about the idea?

Advocacy groups like the Medicare Rights Center oppose restricting Medigap plans, saying it would simply shift more costs from the government to elderly and low-income people who can least afford it. “Some in government feel people in Medicare don’t have enough ‘skin in the game,’” says Ilene Stein, federal policy director for the center. In fact, she says, people on Medicare already pay 15 percent of their incomes for health care, well above the level paid by non-Medicare households. While the proposals would cap maximum annual spending per enrollee to $5,500 or $7,500, “that’s a lot of money for someone making $22,000,” the median household income for those on Medicare, she says.

Still, Joe Antos of the conservative American Enterprise Institute says many of those people already pay large premiums for Medigap coverage – and would likely see those premiums decline if “first-dollar” protections are barred. Antos and Jonathan Gruber, an economist at MIT and consultant to Democrats, both think that if Congress were to change supplemental coverage – or the traditional program itself – that lawmakers would create exemptions for lower-income beneficiaries.

How would the proposal affect a Medigap policy I already own?

Congress would have to decide whether to impose restrictions only on new policies or include existing coverage.

What about people who don’t have a Medigap plan?

Only about 10 percent of seniors don’t have some sort of supplemental coverage. Some people have military/VA benefits, others are in Medicaid, and some have coverage through Medicare Advantage plans, which are insurance policies offered by private insurers as an alternative to traditional Medicare.

What are the chances that these ideas will be adopted by lawmakers?

Because making any change that could be seen as a cut in Medicare benefits carries huge political risk, previous calls for changing the traditional Medicare program or limiting first-dollar coverage through supplemental insurance have not picked up support. But now, when failure to lift the debt ceiling could result in widespread economic problems, a middle-of-the night compromise between warring factions in Congress could put it back on the table.

“Normally, this would be dead on arrival. But this is such a dicey environment that these guys are going to cut some kind of deal at midnight either before or after Aug. 2 in such a hurry that they won’t be worried about the kinds of things people normally worry about when they cut senior benefits,” says Robert Laszewski, an Alexandria-Virginia-based consultant to the health care industry.

Antos is less sure. He says the potential savings of $53 billion over 10 years would be just a tiny slice of any deficit-reduction deal and might not be worth the political hit Congress would take from seniors.

“You can’t sugar coat it,” says Antos. “It would be much easier to do what lawmakers have always done in Medicare, which is lower payment rates (to doctors and hospitals) or restrict services in ways that are subtle and complicated. But to do something that looks like changing benefits, I don’t see it this time.”

Affordable Medigap Plans

Tell Washington to keep their mitts off your Medicare supplement insurance plans!

Georgia Medicare Plans offers plans to save you money and minimize your out of pocket expenses. Compare Georgia Medicare supplement insurance plans and rates online now.